Humanitarian response in urban contexts

Published by ODI/ALNAP, this Good Practice Review is structured into four chapters. Chapter 1, on context, sets the scene. It describes ways of seeing the city (there are many; this section presents three). The chapter then discusses four particular threats: naturally-triggered disasters, climate change, conflict and violence. The next sections look at urban displacement and vulnerability – cities are homes to extremes of wealth and poverty, and the poorest are almost always the most vulnerable. The chapter ends with a discussion of actors in the urban space associated with the humanitarian ecosystem.

Chapter 2, on themes and issues, comprises three sections. The first covers the complexities and challenges of coordination in urban areas. The next looks at corruption risks, both within urban institutions and structures and in aid programming itself. The chapter ends with a section on resilience, which is included given its importance in humanitarian efforts to reduce future risk, as well as figuring prominently in global agreements such as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
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