Mainstreaming disaster risk reduction into development: challenges and experience in the Philippines

This case study was undertaken by the ProVention Consortium in support of the process to mainstream disaster risk reduction into development, examining experience to date and challenges ahead in mainstreaming at a country level. The paper focuses on the first two, and arguably most difficult steps, in mainstreaming – awareness-raising and the establishment of a sufficient, stable enabling environment. It is based on experience in the Philippines, focusing on mainstreaming from the government’s perspective. The findings of this and further case studies in the series will be drawn together into a brief on essential requisites and related mechanisms, opportunities and incentives for effective mainstreaming, including good practice examples.

ProVention Consortium, 2009.

Online version of case study
http://www.preventionweb.net/files/8700_8700mainstreamingphilippines1.pdf

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