Cash and Voucher Assistance in Migration Context: Voices of Migrants (Colombia (En/Sp), Niger (En/Fr) , Kenya)

In recent years, CVA has become increasingly relevant in humanitarian responses. Organizations have developed an interest in exploring their multiple benefits. Implementing delivery mechanisms suited to a variety of contexts, both in emergencies and early recovery, promotes accountability mechanisms that identify condition-based community preferences by gathering information from communities themselves. In most cases, technological advances have made it easier to deliver such assistance in an agile and safe way.

However, accessing CVA sometimes implies having a document that validates people’s identities, or having access to the technology, which, in migration environments, can be complex. This has led to the development of strategies that facilitate the identification process to access services, involving tools such as digital identities.

The following researches below in Colombia, Niger, and Kenya are part of a global consultation by the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, focused on identifying opportunities and challenges in the use of CVA in attending to vulnerable migrant populations, as well as recommendations to increase the use of this modality

Using Cash Assistance to Support Migrants in Colombia (Spanish Video with English Subtitles): Learn more about the National Strategy of the Colombian Red Cross to support migrants with cash and voucher assistance.

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