Empowering communities to prepare for cyclones

Cox’s Bazar District is in the Bay of Bengal, at the south-eastern corner of Bangladesh, bordering Myanmar. It is particularly vulnerable to the tropical cyclones that frequently hit the region, causing deadly storm surges and wind damage. The worst cyclone in recent years took place in 1991, resulting in 150,000 deaths – more than 90 per cent of whom were women and children. Smaller-scale disasters are common due to tropical storms, and many more lives have been lost over the years. This briefing sets out the impact of the Community Based Disaster Preparedness Programme – a pioneering initiative to enable communities in the region to better prepare for cyclones and minimize their impact on their lives and livelihoods. It assesses the legacy of the programme some eight years after its closure, highlighting key achievements and learning points. Published in 2010.

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