Guide to Post Disaster Recovery Capitals (ReCap)

The Recovery Capitals (ReCap) project applies a Community Capitals lens to disaster recovery to increase understanding about the interacting influences of social, built, financial, political, human, cultural and natural capital on wellbeing outcomes. It aims to support wellbeing after disasters by providing evidence-based guidance through a range of resources in different formats to accommodate different learning styles and ways of working.

For each of the seven community capitals, there is a section outlining its role in disaster recovery, including how it can affect wellbeing and influence other community capitals. The community capitals are deeply interrelated, so you will find information relevant to each capital throughout the document. Icons after each statement of ‘what we know’ illustrate some of the links revealed in the underlying evidence base.

The statements of ‘what we know’ summarise academic evidence, but they do not represent the entire evidence base. They are accompanied by prompts for those involved in disaster recovery to consider when applying this knowledge to their own work.

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