Jordan: Syrians call home

War and harsh living conditions in Syria have driven thousands of families into Jordan. In the Zaatari camp, which is the largest camp hosting Syrian refugees in Jordan, a large number of Syrians lack the means to stay in touch with their relatives in Syria or abroad. Through its tracing office and with the support of Jordan Red Crescent Society volunteers, the ICRC gives refugees the opportunity to contact their relatives by providing free-of-charge phone calls. The ICRC also registers and keeps track of vulnerable individuals, such as unaccompanied minors, with a view to informing their families of their whereabouts. Where feasible, the ICRC helps vulnerable people to reunite with their families, whether in or outside the camp.

More than 88,800 refugees have called relatives in Syria or abroad from Zaatari camp since the ICRC began providing tracing services in September 2012.

The ICRC also provides tracing services in Azraq camp, which is the second largest camp hosting Syrian refugees in Jordan. More than 8,300 refugees have called relatives in Syria or abroad from Azraq camp since the ICRC began providing tracing services in September 2014. 

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