Pakistan: Recovering from the 2010 floods

In 2010, floods devastated Pakistan on massive scale. IOM provided emergency shelter to 2.76 million individuals and life-saving health services to 120,000 individuals. In addition, IOM completed over 9,000 one room shelters and reached 7 million individuals through humanitarian communications.

Hafeez Mai lost her husband and home when massive floods swept through Pakistan in July 2010, leaving her with four children to care for. This is the story of her resilience in the face of great tragedy.

IOM, 2011

Are you sure you want to delete this "resource"?
This item will be deleted immediately. You cannot undo this action.

Related Resources

Case Study, Guidance material
13 Dec 2018
Climate & Development Knowledge Network’s (CDKN) guide to communicating climate change offers tips for practitioners to effectively communicate climate change and climate change adaptation and mitigation solutions, with a focus on convinci...
Tags: Case Study, Guidance material, Climate Change Adaptation, Public Awareness and Public Education
Assessment or evaluation, Video
26 Sep 2014
The third edition of the United Nations Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction (GAR): “From shared risk to shared value: The business case for disaster risk reduction” is a resource for understanding and analyzing global dis...
Tags: Assessment or evaluation, Video, Community Risk Assessment, Risk Assessment, Urban Risk Reduction
Game
21 May 2024
The GDPC and the American Red Cross noticed a gap in youth preparedness resources when it comes to teens, where preparedness resources are often curated for adult or child audiences, which leaves teens (ages 13-19) under engaged and underprepared. To...
Tags: Game, Capacity Building for Disaster Risk Management, Climate Change Adaptation, Disability Inclusive Disaster Preparedness, Hazard, Mental Health and Psychosocial Support, Resilience and Disaster Risk Management, Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), Urban Preparedness, Water, Sanitation & Hygiene (WASH), Women and Gender in Disaster Management, Youth Disaster Preparedness
Scroll to Top