What Makes A Community Disaster Ready? A Meta-Evaluation.

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Over the course of 2019-2020, the American Red Cross commissioned a meta‑evaluation to explore what makes a community disaster-ready.

This meta-evaluation examines 24 program or project evaluations, half of which were of American Red Cross community disaster preparedness programs, and half of the programs implemented by external actors.

The aim of the meta‑evaluation was to answer the following questions:

1. What makes communities disaster ready?
2. What makes outcomes sustainable and replicable?
3. When is a community disaster ready?
4. How do contextual factors affect success?
5. What other learning emerges from this study?

Based on the findings and conclusions of this meta‑analysis, to strengthen community preparedness and increase the sustainability and replicability of successful actions, the consultants concluded that organizations that want to support community preparedness should:

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