Scientists Can Now Predict Where People Will Run When An Earthquake Strikes

Article about a model developed in Japan to predict people’s movement patterns after disaster events. The model is based on a study of travel patterns after the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011 based on GPS data from mobile phones users. The study was conducted by the Univeristy of Tokyo.

Overview article in Fast Company, Research paper from University of Tokyo
http://www.fastcoexist.com/3034990/scientists-can-now-predict-where-people-will-run-when-an-earthquake-strikes, http://shiba.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp/song/wp-content/uploads/papers/SIGKDD13.pdf

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