Why Games?

Games encourage empowered action and they generate shared experiences and discussions that are truly participatory. For humanitarian organizations and local volunteers it is an active learning experience; a playful dialogue about situated action rather than an abstract discussion or exercise.
Despite their usefulness, many people view games as a child’s pastime, as a medium that is not serious, and is made solely for entertainment. This view is supported by media coverage of games, in particular videogames, where it’s all about shooting space marines and adolescent fantasy. However, a longer view of game’s role in society reveal that they are an ancient form that is found in almost every culture. The earliest evidence of games predate written culture, and indicate that they are a large part of cultural practice and making sense of the world. 

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